10.27.11

10.27.11

thomasfeng:

Lyric Suite: II. Andante amoroso by Alban Berg

Absolutely beautiful…

(via thomasfeng-deactivated20111106)

cavetocanvas:

The Kiss - Gustav Klimt, 1907-08

this is Thomas’s favorite Klimt painting

cavetocanvas:

The Kiss - Gustav Klimt, 1907-08

this is Thomas’s favorite Klimt painting

Preludes

by T.S. Eliot

I’m actually thinking about doing a short song cycle based on these…maybe for tenor and Pierrot ensemble (flute, clarinet, violin, cello, piano)? Beautiful poetry, although I don’t know if setting a text about the malaise of modernity is something that 17-year-olds can do without being offputting. :/

Also, please note that it is Andrew Lloyd Webber who made a T.S. Eliot reference, and not the other way around. >:c

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some creeper drawings I did in the library yesterday

some creeper drawings I did in the library yesterday

daylighteveryone:

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD
It’s been a practice of mine to post mixes of music on blogs - I thought it only prudent to inaugurate the new blog with one. I used to post nonclassical mixes but lately I’ve been posting more classical: it seems that’s the genre that needs more support in being shared and loved.
Here you’ll find three glacial, meditative, but very human works; soft-spoken enough to be played in the background for atmosphere, yet interesting enough to be listened to intently. As with much modern music, these pieces might be difficult to “get,” but I assure you, with an open mind and some getting-used-to, modern music isn’t so hard to penetrate, and is definitely very rewarding. It’s like fine wine.
If this is well received, I’ll continue posting such compilations in the future. If you enjoyed, do reblog!
—
1. Fragment for string quartet by Elliott Carterperformed by the Arditti String Quartet
2-6. Rothko Chapel for viola, celesta, percussion, and choir by Morton Feldmanperformed by David Abel, Karen Rosenak, William Winant and the UC Berkeley Chamber Chorus - Philip Brett conducting
7-11. Concerto for bassoon and low strings by Sofia Gubaidulinaperformed by Valeri Popov with the Russian State Symphony Orchestra - Pyotr Meshchaninov conducting

for anyone who didn’t see it the first time around!

daylighteveryone:

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

It’s been a practice of mine to post mixes of music on blogs - I thought it only prudent to inaugurate the new blog with one. I used to post nonclassical mixes but lately I’ve been posting more classical: it seems that’s the genre that needs more support in being shared and loved.

Here you’ll find three glacial, meditative, but very human works; soft-spoken enough to be played in the background for atmosphere, yet interesting enough to be listened to intently. As with much modern music, these pieces might be difficult to “get,” but I assure you, with an open mind and some getting-used-to, modern music isn’t so hard to penetrate, and is definitely very rewarding. It’s like fine wine.

If this is well received, I’ll continue posting such compilations in the future. If you enjoyed, do reblog!

1. Fragment for string quartet by Elliott Carter
performed by the Arditti String Quartet

2-6. Rothko Chapel for viola, celesta, percussion, and choir by Morton Feldman
performed by David Abel, Karen Rosenak, William Winant and the UC Berkeley Chamber Chorus - Philip Brett conducting

7-11. Concerto for bassoon and low strings by Sofia Gubaidulina
performed by Valeri Popov with the Russian State Symphony Orchestra - Pyotr Meshchaninov conducting

for anyone who didn’t see it the first time around!

Living Things Must Grow, 24 x 18 in., micron pen on bristol paper
I fixed this up some more and got a better picture of it! It’s also our new icon (and most people seem to notice this piece a lot more than my others… :3) so I thought I may as well.

Living Things Must Grow, 24 x 18 in., micron pen on bristol paper

I fixed this up some more and got a better picture of it! It’s also our new icon (and most people seem to notice this piece a lot more than my others… :3) so I thought I may as well.

cavetocanvas:

Ancient Sound - Paul Klee, 1925

still my favorite Klee painting

cavetocanvas:

Ancient Sound - Paul Klee, 1925

still my favorite Klee painting

Thomas Feng – Song for L (20 plays)

Song for L for solo flute by Thomas Feng

I wrote this piece back in March, as a short exercise in 12-tone writing (the results are surprisingly warm!), and as a gift to Lulu. It’s the only piece of which I have a decent recording, so I thought I would just leave it here…

Sept Papillons for solo cello by Kaija Saariaho
performed by Alexis Descharmes

"Sept papillons" was the first piece Saariaho wrote after her opera "L’Amour de loin" , it was written during the rehearsal period of the opera in Salzburg. One can sense the desire to find a world which has nothing to to do with the opera neither in style nor in language. From the metaphors of the opera which all have an eternal quality - love, yearning and death - she moved now to a metaphor of the ephemeral: butterfly. Still, the opera is present in one or two melodic passages of the piece.

Also, from the long time-spans of the opera she moved to these seven miniatures, which each seem to be studies on a different aspect of fragile and ephemeral movement that has no beginning nor end. 

— Anssi Karttunen